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Statement from Mayor Gregor Robertson:

“I remain fully opposed to the reactivation of trains on the Arbutus corridor, after more than 15 years of inactivity on the route. The City of Vancouver has a wide variety of significant public safety concerns about CP’s course of action, and City staff have thoroughly communicated those concerns to Transport Canada.

“The track in question was abandoned, unused, and unmaintained by CP for 15 years. The population density along the track is significant, there is a lack of upgraded crossing infrastructure on a short corridor with nearly fifty level crossings that include every major east-west arterial in Vancouver. The grade on the corridor is some of the steepest of any rail line in all of British Columbia, and the City of Vancouver has not been permitted to accompany officials for their safety inspection of the track.

“We continue to be available to CP should they wish to return to talks with the City on the future of the corridor, but Vancouver will not be bullied, and we will not accept seeing our neighbourhoods and families along the corridor having their safety put at risk. The City will continue to review our options in response to every action taken on the corridor.”

- Mayor Gregor Robertson

50% of trips in Vancouver made by walking, cycling or transit

A new report presented to City Council today showed that the City of Vancouver is achieving its Greenest City 2020 goal for transportation mode share, with 50% of trips within the city now consisting of walking, biking, or transit — up from 40% in 2008.

Car use in the City has declined even as the economy and population have grown, while cycling has seen a steady increase: city-wide cycling trips saw a year-over-year increase of 20% from 2013 to 2014.

“Our Greenest City and Transportation 2040 actions are making Vancouver a safer, cleaner, more environmentally friendly city to get around,” said Mayor Gregor Robertson. “Investments in safer walking and cycling – protected bike lanes, improved crosswalks, better lighting – are encouraging people to walk and bike more, and we’re now seeing big increases in walking and bike trips throughout the city.”

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We’ve heard from trusted emergency response leaders across our region: Voting ‪#‎YesForTransit‬ will ensure safer roads, safer rides home for our loved ones, and faster response times in any emergency. Help spread the word:

We’ve heard from trusted emergency response leaders across our region: Voting #YesForTransit will ensure safer roads, safer rides home for our loved ones, and faster response times in any emergency.

Posted by Vancouver Mayor's Office on Wednesday, 25 March 2015

Vancouver City Council voted unanimously today to support the ‘Yes’ side in the upcoming transit referendum, building support for better transit and roads throughout Metro Vancouver.

“Vancouver is sending a message that we need to do everything we can to ensure the referendum passes, so that we can cut congestion, protect our environment and grow our economy,” said Mayor Gregor Robertson. “With Metro Vancouver’s population increasing by another one million people by 2040, we have to invest in better transit. The alternative is crippling gridlock and traffic congestion that will destroy our region’s livability.”

The motion was introduced by City Councillor George Affleck, which called for City Council to support the Mayor in his efforts to ensure the plebiscite succeeds, and for staff to report back on work underway to build support.

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Cycling routes and separated bike lanes have seen record usage numbers throughout the month of July.

This year, the Burrard Bridge bike lane marks its fifth year in use, seeing more than 5 million trips since its installation. This summer, the Burrard Bridge bike lane has seen record bike traffic month over month, with July hitting a record number 195,000 bike trips up from 161,000 in July 2013 – a 21 per cent increase.

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Residents along Vancouver’s Arbutus Corridor are receiving letters from Mayor Gregor Robertson this week regarding CPR’s stated intention to reactivate cargo trains through their neighbourhoods. The Mayor re-states his firm opposition to cargo trains on the route, provides background on the history of conversations between the CPR and the City of Vancouver, and indicates that the City is prepared to pay fair market value for land.

“As Mayor, I strongly believe that the Arbutus Corridor should remain as it is today – an enjoyable route for people to walk, run and bike along, as well as a home to the many community gardens that contribute to our neighbourhood,” writes Mayor Robertson. “We do not believe there is any business case for CPR to reactivate trains along the Corridor.”

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